Napoleon greece

In 1812, thinking that Russia was plotting an alliance with England, Napoleon launched an invasion against the Russians that eventually ended with his troops retreating from Moscow and much of Europe uniting against him. In 1814, Napoleon’s broken forces gave up and Napoleon offered to step down in favor of his son. When this offer was rejected, he abdicated and was sent to Elba. In March 1815, he escaped his island exile and returned to Paris, where he regained supporters and reclaimed his emperor title, Napoleon I, in a period known as the Hundred Days. However, in June 1815, he was defeated at the bloody Battle of Waterloo . Napoleon’s defeat ultimately signaled the end of France’s domination of Europe. He abdicated for a second time and was exiled to the remote island of Saint Helena, in the southern Atlantic Ocean, where he lived out the rest of his days. He died at age 52 on May 5, 1821, possibly from stomach cancer, although some theories contend he was poisoned.

When the Napoleonic French occupied the island in 1797, the Corfiots initially welcomed them with enthusiasm, believing that French revolutionary principles meant that the lower classes would be treated better than under Venetian rule . But this was not the case. The French imposed heavy taxes on the people, though they did introduce a system of primary education and a printing house. But two years later a combined Russian and Turkish fleet captured the island after four months of fighting, and Corfu became the capital of the puppet Septinsular Republic which included all the Ionian islands. Then in 1807 when Russia and France signed the Treaty of Tilsit, Corfu and the other Ionian islands once again reverted to Napoleon . This time around the French took more of an interest in local development, establishing the first Ionian Academy, importing printing presses and introducing new crops like potatoes and tomatoes.

New Military Traditions – Each of the Greek States has a unique top-tier military tradition: Athenian fleets may be honoured as Children of the Aegaean, improving the ramming ability of their ships whilst allowing them to secure more income when raiding; Spartan armies may be remembered as Peers of Leonidas, improving their melee defense capabilities and reducing their upkeep; the armies of Epirus may be feared as Hounds of Molossus, granting them greater charge bonuses whilst allowing them to keep public order problems in check. 

Napoleon greece

napoleon greece

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